Poetry

(For Moondog's collections of couplets available in print click here.)

50 Couplets - Some Couplets from Milleniad - The Common Calendar

Suite: Bucky BlueEyes
A Poem By Hammond Guthrie Dedicated To Moondog

suitebuckyblueeyes5.mp3  

 
 
50 Couplets by Moondog


1.
You like? you like the thoughts? you like the thoughts i think? you do?
They're naught to me compared to just one fleeting thought of you.

2.
The ant inherited the earth because he was so meek.
The will was signed, "The Animal" who turned the other cheek.

3.
We have to buy new cars each year or we'll be classified
by all the Joneses in our town, who must be pacified.

4.
His icy legions, camped on either pole, are at their ease
awaiting orders, when to start another icy squeeze.

5.
Prairie sod has heaped revenge on those who turned her under.
Clouds of dust, which hide the sun, no longer hide the blunder.

6.
An armored knight fell off a ship and sank into the blue.
He looked a lobster in the eye and said, "you're armored, to?"

7.
We men just didn't think to offer Crewcut Su a seat;
for we assumed she was a man despite her dainty feet.

8.
In retrospect he sees a pond, and on that pond he sees two
fleets of warring centipedes whose decks are lined with fleas.

9.
A fairy queen, two inches tall, looked up mb my eyes;
and with her magic wand she brought me down to just her size.

10.
Chief, they saw you coming when they came with horn-rimmed rifles.
Sad to say, these bargain hunters took you in with trifles.

11.
Within a moment's time the final grain of sand will drop.
Upend your hour-glass, old man, or the universe will stop.

12.
She bought a cover to cover the seat; but the cover was so nice,
she bought a cover to cover the cover; and now it's covered twice.

13.
You're climbing up the ladder of success; he's climbing down.
And you can't help but smile, i guess; and he can't help but frown.

14.
A bird alighted on an Indian's shoulder, and she said,
"i am the feathered spirit of your mother who is dead."

15.
How was i to know that newsmen take the world for granted?
How was i to know the news they deign to print is slanted?

16.
They hacked away a frozen deer in ice an eon old,
to eat, from Nature's deep-freeze, all the meat that they could hold.

17.
I pushed a diplomat right through the window of his suite;
and, like a common alley-cat, he landed on his feet.

18.
A snowflake settled on my hand and said, as if in fear,
"I must be on my way before i turn into a tear."

19.
The seventh wonder of the world was not the Sphinx, you Huns;
but you were the seventh wonder when you shot at it with guns.

20.
Drag the river up and down to find the Miss who's missing.
Crowd around her, curiously, to see whom Death is kissing.

21.
The greatest earthly monarch has a body and a soul.
His royal name is Seasky and he rules from pole to pole.

22.
I see her in the midnight sky, my fairest of the fair.
She's dancing on a crescent moon and stars are in her hair.

23.
One day a mounted hunter heeled a wounded boar, who wheeled,
and gutted horse and rider, leaving death upon the field.

24.
A thousand feet of scaly neck stood sentinel at sea,
as cloud-enshrouded radar eyes kept peering down at me.

25.
Pioneers, without their "eers" are peons, bent on pouting.
Give them back their "eers" and they'll be peons bent on flouting.

26.
"Embrace me, slave," the Princess sighed; and as he did, she screamed.
The guards rushed in and cut him down, as twenty sabers gleamed.

27.
A snail, whose house was on his back; amused a passing mouse.
Unhurt, the snail replied with cheer, "the laughs are on the house."

28.
You couldn't tell me more than when you looked into my eyes.
Now, you are there and i am here; and hope within me dies.

29.
The gods who wielded bolts of lightning were not gods, but men
who used the atom, as we did, to wreck the world again.

30.
"Go commercial," cried the prostitutes, in every calling.
"SeIl your soul, but sell yourself. Get with it. Stop the stalling."

31.
The low-down fish don't dare to swim too high, or they'll explode.
The high-up fish don't dare to swim too low, or they'll implode.

32.
I'm with my extra heavy date, but I'm not very fond
of the extra-heavy makeup on my self-effacing blonde.

33.
"The City is a cancer on the body politic."
"The atom shall remove the growth that makes the patient sick."

34.
The treasure fleet which sank in stormy seas, so long ago, has had no marked effect on fish economy, below.

35.
Loopholes passed the flintlock pipe of peace for half an hour.
Puffs of smoke combined to cloak a heavy leaden shower.

36.
Awakening, you find yourself still sitting in your chair;
so raise the pen you didn't drop and drop a hint, you square.

37.
A skeleton's in your closet and a mirror's in there too.
You're looking in the mirror and the skeleton's none but you.

38.
It came to pass that woman stripped Elizabethan man
of all his peacock finery, and gave him black and tan.

39.
A mole in a hole, a mut in a hut, a mouse in a house, makes three.
I'm sure you could think of many more, but three are enough for me.

40.
"Rush the beach, good Anglemen, and stop the Norman landing.
Use what strategy you will, but leave no Norman standing."

41.
I met a maid with braided hair so long it touched the ground.
I tied my hands and feet with it and swore that i'd be bound.

42.
The Skipper's pen proceeds to write upon the inky blue;
and leaves a wake of mistic words, unfathomed by the crew.

43.
Offensive and defensive weapons thought they ought to race;
but, as they ran, defensive weapons couldn't keep the pace.

44.
La donna plucked a blushing rose, her lover plucked a harp;
and when he sang, he sang of love; but sang a trifle sharp.

45.
Written with a fork-ed pen, your treaties can be broken.
Smitten with a fork-ed tongue, your Lucifer has spoken.

46.
They had their tickertape tickets which they bought with borrowed cash;
and, half insane, they took a plane they never dreamed would crash.

47.
A sunny sun and a cloudy cloud are playing peek-a-boo.
If you were here, i promise, we'd be peek-a-booing too.

48.
A boulder took an acorn in and watered him with rain.
He grew into a mighty oak and split his host in twain.

49.
"It's beautiful," i said as i beheld a marble bust.
"Just who are you to tell me so?" it muttered in disgust.

50.
Men of mirth are men of worth, wherever men are silly,
- anywhere from Athens, Greece, to Santiago, Chile.

Published by

LOUIS HARDIN PUBLISHING Co. 179 East 3rd Street
New York 9 N.Y.


From Hardin's collection of poetry

M I L L E N I A D

I find the greatest freedom in the stricture of a form
that paradoxes abnormality within a norm.

The Sword of Damocles hanging over all of us.
In view of that what subject can we sensibly discuss.

My credo may be this, that ere my dirth of days is passed,
I´ll strive to live each one as if it were my first and last.

You pity me in exile? Well, then pity if you must,
but live - before your dear identity is lost in dust.

Carnivores who lived on Herbivores who lived on plants,
were all consumed by Omnivores who walked around in pants.

He who didn´t know who didn´t know he didnt know,
became the he who didn´t know who knew he didn´t know,
and he became the he who knew who didn´t know he knew,
who finally became the he who knew who knew he knew.

A glance, a smile, a chance hallo and then - a fond embrace.
The years roll back before my eyes to scenes I can´t erase.

We grope with eyes wide open t´ward the darkness of futurity,
with faith in outermost instead of innermost security.

The trombone and the sackbut stare each other down in shame.
One sees what he had been, the other sees what he became.

The Whole declared, "You´ll never know the sum of all My parts,
so stop your foolish figuring, and mend your broken hearts."

Proof that God exist is in the overtones from one
to nine, besides revealing how the Universe is run.

What I say of science here, I say without condition,
that science is the latest and the greatest superstition.

The Leaning Tower leaned a little farther south and said,
"I wouldn´t be so famous if I had a level head."

A snow-flake landed on my hand and said, as if in fear,
"I must be on my way, before I turn into a tear."

Having healthy-wealthy possibility amounts
to nothing, if you do not know that every minute counts.


THE COMMON CALENDAR

by Louis Hardin

Ten thousand years ago when Agriculture ushered in the Age of Man,
ten thousand years would spin the span before the Cosmic Calendar began

Two thousand years ago a calendar was abrogated. In the face
of opposite there appeared another calendar to take its place

To abrogate the Calendar of Caesar was a blessing in disguise.
It gave the Common Calendar the opening to do the worldly wise.

We shouldn't abrogate the abrogater when it only needs to be
enlarged by addding on the eight thousand years. Eight thousand One is One A.D.

Eight thousand equals One B.C. No longer is there need for crabbery.
The numbers move in one direction, forward, as they do in old A.D.

Form theological to geological the calendar would go
In seeing justice being done each race and creed is dancing to and fro

A reckoning is beckoning, devoid of racial and religious links.
"The year, Two Thousand, shall become the year, Ten Thousand," prophesised the Sphinx.

How simple is the Common Calendar. It centers on the number 8,
and all one has to do is add eight thousand years to any A.D. date.

With pencil turning 1 to 1998 into a 9 to end
the reign of Christendom that every other race and creed would recommend

Turn the 1 of 1999 into a 9 to make it four,
enough to turn into the "Tenth Millennium," too much to ask for more



CANON

note scale for calendar

This canon is prophetic when it comes to number 10, for there is where
the calendars reverse priorities in what is quite beyond compare.

The calendar, 2000, is above until it unisons on A.
The calendar, 10000, is below until it unisons on A.

Who'd ever guess the overtones would lend themselves to such a mundane thing
as calendars, for we are mindful of the great authority they bring

The overtones from one to nine in both directions represent the space
between the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Glaciations where it's taking place.

Take note of this, each note equates a thousand years of Interglacial Thaw
the Seventeenth that's coming to an end, a picture no-one wants to draw.

Before we humans quite the Stage of Life we should consider just how nice
it's been and will be till this place is covered by a mile or more of ice.



THE COMMON CALENDAR
    A.D.
10000 The Tenth Millenium 2000
9999 Aborgation of the Christian Calendar 1999
9975 The Cosmicode 1975
9776 The first written constitution 1776
9491 The rediscovery of America 1492
9000 The Cross Versus the Crescent 1000
8600 Moslems, the third Monophicites 600
8570 Mohammed 570
8300 Trinitarians versus Monophicites 300
8100 Christians, the second Monophicites 100
8001 Jesus- Abrogation of the Pagan Calendar 1 B.C.
7996 Joshua 5
7450 Confucius 551
7441 Buddha 560
7421 Pythagoras 580
7201 Zarathustra 800
7151 Homer 850
7000 Hebrews, the first Monophicites 1001
6501 First Written Constitution 1500
6470 Moses 1531
6309 The Hammurabl Code 1692
5000 The Ice Man 3001
2501 The Black Sea Flood 5000
1 The Age of Man 8000
  (agriculture and urbanization)  
  End of the Seventeenth Ice Age  


According to the Cosmicode contraction comes before expansion, so
to say, expansion comes before contraction, isn't being in the know.

The overtones from one to nine equate the Code, the Code that has a key.
That key is diminution. Two to one the ratio rises out of three.

Contraction and expansion, in that order, are the consequence of cause-
effect inversion, quite the most chaotic of the cosmicoded laws.

Diminutions one to three begin on G, harmonic three, and end
on G, harmonic seven of the row below, on that you can depend.

The system wouldn't work if any overtone, from one to nine, had found
itself to be some other place, a fact that never ceases to astound.

Contraction's cause has overtones, from one to four, that have no precedent.
Expansion's cause has overtones, from six to nine, that have no precedent.

The overtone of overtones dividing one to four from six to nine,
is 5, the most imposing overtone of all, I call, the Dividein.

Contraction's cause becomes expansion's last effect the while contaction's last
effect becomes expansion's cause, with 5 between the present and the past.

Why contraction's last effect becomes expansion's cause is plain to see.
On passing 5 the last of all is finest of all to claim priority.

Contraction and expansion merge their awesome urges in contransion, C
for short, enough to pyramid a grid of diminutions one to three.

The overtone continuum consists of C above and C below.
In diametric opposition, base to base, the galacseers go.

Closewise both in both directions brings the two-directionality
of time into existence all the Milky way from C to shining C.

Is this the two-directionality of time? The future is the past,
and vice versa? This is how it's been since when the cosmic die was cast.

Overtonean Equasion: O + D = C x 2 = T

the note scale showing expansion and contraction